Using and citing at least one solid academic source, explain that decision’s impact on relations between or the balance of power between state governments and the federal government.

Option #2: Federalism:
Please follow these instructions in creating your post:
Choose one Supreme Court case from history that involved a dispute between a state government and federal government and answer the following questions about it.
Using and citing at least one solid academic source, explain the circumstances of the case (who were the litigants, what was the specific dispute about and what larger issue was at stake?). Explain also the decision made by the Supreme Court and their reasoning behind it.Using and citing at least one solid academic source, explain that decision’s impact on relations between or the balance of power between state governments and the federal government. Your focus should be on the implications of the case for federalism and the conflict between the powers of the federal and state governments.Using and citing at least one solid academic source, make an argument for or against the Court’s decision. I am not looking for an explanation or justification of your opinion or beliefs about the decision, but an evidence-based argument that engages with statistics, research studies, case studies, expert analysis or the like from cited, solid academic sources. State your position clearly and back it up with evidence.I have included sources from a wide variety of ideological viewpoints, but with reputations for factual accuracy. If you want to use a source outside of this list, check with me first.
You may choose from any of the peer-reviewed journals on JSTOR. Any one of the journals would count as a single source.You may choose an academic book (check with me if you are not certain it would count as an academic book). Any one chapter in the book would count as a source. You may use multiple chapters and each chapter would count as a separate source.You may choose a source of primary data or primary historical information. Any one would count as a single source.You may choose an academic/university study (often found on .edu websites). Any one of the studies would count as a single source.You may choose from the following news sources. Any one of these would count as a source.Approved TV and Radio News Network Websites: ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, CSPAN, BBC, CBC, NPR (note that this list does not include FOX, MSNBC or CNN)Approved Major Newspaper Websites: Wall Street Journal, USA Today, New York Times, Washington Post, L.A. Times, Christian Science Monitor, The GuardianApproved Major Newsmagazine Websites: Time, Newsweek, U.S. News and World Report, The Economist, National Journal, The Atlantic, Bloomberg Businessweek, Fortune, Business Insider, Forbes, New Yorker, Foreign Affairs, Mother Jones, National Review, New Republic, The Nation, The Weekly Standard, Rolling Stone, The HillApproved Wire Services: Associated Press, ReutersApproved Think Tanks: Center for Public Policy Priorities, Texas Public Policy Foundation, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Center for American Progress, Center for Economic and Policy Research, Economic Policy Institute, Institute for Policy Studies, Rockridge Institute, Brookings Institution, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Constitution Project, Council on Foreign Relations, New America Foundation, Resources for the Future, Henry L. Stimson Center, The RAND Corporation, Urban Institute, Competitive Enterprise Institute, Goldwater Institute, Mackinac Center for Public Policy, CATO Institute, American Enterprise Institute, Center for Immigration Studies, Center for Security Policy, Foreign Policy Research Institute, Heritage FoundationApproved Extra Credit: I like to encourage the careful reading of instructions, so if you got this far, type “It pays to read instructions” at the end of your post and I will add an extra 3 points to your discussion grade – just don’t indicate to other students that this is for extra credit.Approved Factcheckers and Media Bias Watchdogs: Politifact.com, Factcheck.org, Media Bias / Fact Check (MBFC News), TruthOrFiction.com, Lead Stories, Hoax Slayer, Full Fact, Media Matters for America, Media Research CenterApproved Online Sources, Blogs and Vlogs: Constitution Center, Oyez.org, Politico, Google News, Yahoo News, Huffington Post, Drudge Report, Democracy Now!, Vox, Vice, The Conversation, Ballotpedia, OpenSecrets, Project Vote Smart, ThoughtCo, MediumApproved Polling Sites: Gallup.com, FiveThirtyEight.com, The Texas Politics Project, polls conducted by universities.Approved Texas Sources: Texas Tribune, Austin American-Statesman, Houston Chronicle, Dallas Morning News, Dallas Observer, San-Antonio Express-News, Texas Observer, Texas Monthly, D Magazine

order now